social media, Web 2.0

Is Social Media changing our relationship with Death?

“This morning I’ve started the most amazing journey”. These are the opening words of a Facebook status update of a friend of mine, announcing her own death. The status goes on to explain about her terminal illness (many of her friends, like me, were unaware of it), explain why she kept it private, and say good-bye, all in first person. How peculiar yet powerful is it?

Surely my friend was not someone belonging to the “Internet generation”, being in her seventies. Still, she was a moderately active Facebook user. Especially as someone living far away from many of her friends, she used Facebook as a way to keep in touch. And when she understood that her illness was terminal, she decided to arrange for what was going to happen on her profile. Hence my question: is social media changing our relationship with death?

There are many examples of how death is represented on social media and how social media becomes the first point of arrival for mourners (and the curious). Especially with famous people, their Facebook profiles become sources of photographs for the press. Their final status updates are used to show how sudden their departure was. On Twitter there is a flow of messages from mourners using hashtags as #RIP. Steve Jobs’ death became a trending topic on Twitter, as Amy WInehouse’s. But all of this is just the digital transposition¬†of an non-digital process.

Announcing one own’s death is a new kind of behaviour, a novel need emerging as a consequence of the perceived importance of social media in our everyday lives. As we have become less worried of posting photos of our children and to display our location to a level of accuracy that would have scared us ten years ago, so we have started experiencing death in unexpected ways. We can still see the profiles of dead friends as they were still part of our daily lives. As an eternal memorial to their lives, they stay with us, presumably forever – or until Mr Facebook decides to delete them, sometimes upon request of friends and relatives. But differently from Twitter, where a profile of someone who dies just disappears from their followers’ timeline, Facebook profiles stay there and occasionally make a comeback in the most painful way: “today is your dead friend’s birthday – write happy birthday on their wall!”.

In a new model of human relationships, friends end up writing that well wishing message. The birthday of a dead friend becomes the occasion to revive them. Hundreds of messages from common friends will spread on all the common connections’ timelines. New behaviours, shaping a new attitude towards death. It’s collective mourning. Death has become social. Can you think of an equivalent of this in a non-digital context? Have you ever been at a cemetery, making a mass-visit to a dead loved one? I don’t think so, and that’s where social media is changing our relationship with death. It makes people remember once more and at the same time it provides ways to celebrate a person in their social circle.

Given that death becomes so relevant to our daily digital lives, it’s not surprising that people start making arrangements for their digital after-life. Expressing the need to make your death manifest on your Facebook profile is acknowledging that your digital self is an important part of your life. Some people might behave differently; some might decide to close their profiles, or ask relatives to delete them. As in a non-digital context, for some life will go on, for some will not. But there’s no denying that social media is affecting our perception of and reaction to death in the same public, open way that it has changed other previously private aspects of our lives.


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4 thoughts on “Is Social Media changing our relationship with Death?

  1. 1. An approximate representative of one’s linguistic phenotype can be inferred from one’s posts/entries/tweets/etc; desires, wants, etc., from browsing habits; arithmetize the mental.
    2. Before death, take a full body profile (snapshot) of yourself and store as a lossless format; Tupacogram the physical.

    3. Eternal life/Profit

    Consider this: That when one passes in everyday life, one’s ideas and past actions still persist and affect the natural world. The interesting question is how this is possible, or what it means to establish a ceaseless existence from a finite corporeal body.

  2. Also, death became “social” with the [building] of Steve Job’s digital tombstone. There are many “imposed requirements” that come from the building of a digital tombstone (http://www.apple.com/stevejobs/).

    Must it be respected? Should anyone “hack” it (use it as an attack trajectory)?

    Etc.

  3. Joan says:

    “Can you think of an equivalent of this in a non-digital context? Have you ever been at a cemetery, making a mass-visit to a dead loved one?”

    This probably isn’t usual for non-celebrities, but there are pilgrimages to the final resting places of some people. One that comes to mind is the first American convert to the Baha’i faith, Thornton Chase, whose grave attracts a large group of visitors annually in early Fall. While this has been going on for many years (Chase died nearly 100 years ago), social media also could facilitate this, much the way it has helped the “occupy” movements.

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